Study Finds CBD A Potential Treatment Option For Cannabis Addiction

CBD For Cannabis Addiction
CBD For Cannabis Addiction
CBD For Cannabis Addiction
CBD For Cannabis Addiction

Could people consume CBD for cannabis addiction in the future? Going by the findings of a recent study, it seems possible. Cannabis addiction has no clinically approved form of treatment, and the demand for one exists in the market. Some studies suggest that 47% of individuals who stopped utilizing cannabis have withdrawal symptoms, whereas others indicate that 9% of those who use it would be addicted to it.

A potential solution for marijuana addiction appears to be imminent. In a randomized control trial done recently, researchers found that CBD could aid individuals in quitting cannabis use. They discovered that prescription CBD lessened cannabis ingestion and aided individuals in abstaining from marijuana more than the standard of comparison, i.e, a placebo. Usually, prescription cannabidiol is much stronger as compared to commercial-grade CBD.

“There are currently no safe and effective treatments available for prescription to help people with cannabis use problems,” stated Tom Freeman, one of the study authors. “This is a large and unmet clinical need and could help people to quit in an acceptable treatment format.”

In the event more research corroborates the aforementioned findings, cannabidiol could be an essential treatment for about 22 million individuals who have cannabis addiction. This revelation and every other finding of the study, are featured in the peer-reviewed publication named ‘Lancet Psychiatry’.

To discover whether CBD for marijuana addiction is effective and safe, researchers enlisted the help of some individuals diagnosed with moderately serious cannabis use disorder. This means those individuals had 4 symptoms of marijuana addiction out of a possible 11 symptoms, and these include the following.

  • Continuous marijuana utilization despite the constant/recurrent interpersonal or social issue that it resulted in.
  • A considerable amount of time invested in activities required for obtaining cannabis, using it, or recovering from its adverse effects.

The trial participants acknowledged that their marijuana use was affecting optimal living, so they wished to reduce it. Each of them expressed the wish to stop using it immediately and had attempted to do so once at the least. They were indiscriminately put in treatment groups before being told to consume two prescription CBD capsules twice per day for a month. One group was administered with fake capsules without cannabidiol, whereas the rest got a daily dosage of 200-milligram, 400-milligram, or 800-milligram CBD. The study concluded that the second and third CBD dosages reduced the marijuana intake of the participants.